Pallbearer

Pallbearer

Marissa Nadler, Kayo Dot, Seeress

Tue · March 28, 2017

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

The Grog Shop

$12.00

Off Sale

This event is all ages

Pallbearer
Pallbearer
It is 2014, and on August 19th, two years on from the release of their seminal debut LP Sorrow and Extinction, Pallbearer will unleash the most powerful and engaging chapter in their story thus far; Foundations of Burden – an auditory exploration that is sure to command even more acclaim for these Arkansas natives. Each song carries a weight of melancholic devastation that sees Pallbearer forging it’s own brilliantly desolate path through the realm of heavy metal, crafting music that seeks to balance itself at the very threshold of an unforgiving void. Produced and mixed by Billy Anderson (Sleep, etc) in Portland, OR in the late winter of this year, the album evokes a sonic consciousness of melody coiled tightly around the surge of doom metal at its most relentlessly formidable

Initially formed in 2008, by Joseph D. Rowland (bass) and Brett Campbell (vocals/guitars), Pallbearer grew from the fertile underground metal scene of Little Rock, Arkansas. A year later, joined by guitarist Devin Holt and (since departed) drummer Zach Stine, the four members quickly recorded the band’s first demo. These three tracks garnered well-deserved attention, with critics and fans taking notice of what could only be described as a wholly singular sound from the promising band.

Pallbearer’s debut full-length Sorrow and Extinction was released in early 2012. At just under fifty minutes, the album’s five tracks capitalized on the primal clout of the band’s demo, but here the songs were freed from reliance on volume as the music wavered beautifully between subdued introspection and towering aural force. Released by the well-respected Canadian underground label, Profound Lore, Sorrow and Extinction instantly made waves among listeners and critics who found Pallbearer’s compositional paradox of vulnerability and might unparalleled in a metal world replete with imitators.

Hailed by Rolling Stone as the #1 metal album of 2012, the album also received the coveted “Best New Music” stamp of approval from Pitchfork as well as being cited as one of the year’s best albums by outlets such as Spin and NPR. Sorrow and Extinction proved to be an unequivocal masterpiece in any genre of music and, most importantly, compelled Pallbearer to reach even further creatively for what would come next. 2012 would also see the addition of drummer Mark Lierly, adding further depth to the already immense and mercurial sound the band had pioneered.

Rather than settle themselves in the convenient safety of listener expectation, Pallbearer delve even deeper into melodic contexts for Foundations of Burden, with Rowland now adding his own impressive vocalizations to the sonic texture. This new vocal dynamic brings an authentically visceral component to Pallbearer’s music that, while giving credence to their metal foundations, adds a new and compelling dimension to music which has long since proved itself to be inexorably captivating.
Marissa Nadler
Marissa Nadler
For more than 12 years, Marissa Nadler has perfected her own take on the exquisitely sculpted gothic American songform. On her seventh full-length, Strangers, she has shed any self-imposed restrictions her earlier albums adhered to, stepped through a looking glass, and created a truly monumental work.

In the two years since 2014’s elegiac, autobiographical July, Nadler has reconciled the heartbreak so often a catalyst for her songwriting. Turning her writing to more universal themes, Nadler dives deep into a surreal, apocalyptic dreamscape. Her lyrics touch upon the loneliness and despair of the characters that inhabit them. These muses are primal, fractured, disillusioned, delicate, and alone. They are the unified voice of this record, the titular “strangers.”

This sense of “end times” is exemplified by the sparse, piano-driven opener “Divers of the Dust.” Written utilizing a Dadaist cut-up technique (popularized by David Bowie and William S. Burroughs), Nadler layers hypnagogic imagery of waves pulling cities into the ocean over a very personal tale of longing.

Once again partnered with July producer Randall Dunn (Sunn O))), Earth, Black Mountain) Nadler has created a new album equal in sonic quality to the apocalyptic lyrical tone that covers its 44 minutes. In places her voice and guitar play off subsonic synths, while elsewhere, as in “Katie I Know,” a pulsing drumbeat launches the song off into an intense, confrontational place. “Janie in Love” is another full-band highlight, marrying the album’s most allegorically primal lyrics to the melodic hooks that makes Nadler one of the best songwriters working today.
Kayo Dot
Kayo Dot
"a refined, and sensual, post-new wave tour de force" - Echoes & Dust
"…a hypnotic blend of sensuous grooves, ghostly heaviness and knotty melodies ..." - Time Out New York

Kayo Dot has never made the same record twice. From chamber music to progressive black metal, from goth to jazz and avant-garde classical, Kayo Dot is undeniably experimental and utterly unclassifiable. Since its inception in 2003, the band has released seven full-length albums, including their debut Choirs of the Eye (2003), the conceptual double-album Hubardo (2013) and most recently Coffins on Io (2014, The Flenser). Kayo Dot have toured the globe numerous times over and have played the stages of Roadburn, SXSW, and many other international music festivals. In 2015, frontman Toby Driver organized and played a 12-concert retrospective at The Stone in NYC. Now, Kayo Dot is gearing up for the release of a new LP: Plastic House on Base of Sky, due out June 24th, 2016 from The Flenser.

On Plastic House on Base of Sky, Kayo Dot fully embraces Coffins on Io's electronic allusions, incorporating a variety of synthesizers (many of them vintage analog) to create another work of ambition and magnitude that fuses the explosive musical imagination of a band like Magma with the forward-thinking experimentalism of Conrad Schnitzler or Morton Subotnick. This 40 minute-long, 5-song LP goes beyond the future-noir theme of Coffins on Io and is an innovative and biomechanical work of art. Think seemingly impossible architecture, dead satellites, trashed space stations, wasted old lady heroin addicts hanging out by cheap motel pools, broken people, and a hopeless dead and polluted world transitioning into artifice and mechanism and reacting by being self-destructive, either to the point of utter obliteration or a glorious transhuman condition.

Toby Driver, the primary composer and bandleader of Kayo Dot, has been fiercely productive over the years, and while that usually refers to how many songs or albums an artist has made, with Driver the productivity is in the realm of ideas as much as music itself. In the course of a single Kayo Dot song, the amount of risks and liberties taken with form and convention usually outnumbers what other artists cover in a full album. For as much ground as they cover, it's always in the service of a carefully curated mood and this is apparent on Plastic House on Base of Sky's exploration of our mechanical post-human future-present.

The core of Kayo Dot might be that mood– one that lies at the crossroads of darkness and mystery. In film, music that accompanies mystery is often nocturnal, playing on a primal relation in our brains between the unknown and the night. It's this intersection that is the essence of Kayo Dot. Driver, who recorded Plastic House on Base of Sky in various locations from August 2014 to December 2015, again collaborates with lyricist Jason Byron. Byron, a lifelong student of the occult, gives the listener a feast of words to unpack that are as elusively satisfying as the labyrinths of sound they travel through. Whether by way of menacing guitars, ethereal woodwinds, or aggressive electronics, there's always a sense that a new passage could open, that around the next corner could be anything.

Song premieres, pre-orders and more info on Plastic House on Base of Sky coming soon from Kayo Dot and The Flenser.

Plastic House on Base of Sky Track Listing:

1. Amalia's Theme
2. All The Pain in All the Wide World
3. Magnetism
4. Rings of Earth
5. Brittle Urchin
Seeress
Seeress
Formed in 2005, Seeress has seen it's share of changes. Various shifts in style/members have led them to incredible highs, as well as tumultuous lows (including an extended hiatus from 2010 until 2014). The road; as bumpy and unsure as it has been, has never looked brighter. Reforming in the fall of 2014, Seeress sets upon claiming a new identity. With four original members in tow (Sean, Roger, Mike and Douglas), Seeress set upon writing a new album in the ways they've always wanted. Contemplation and a hard look inward have led them on an exciting new path. Heard throughout the music itself; the beautiful crescendos, the driving riffs: this is what defines Seeress. With hopes of connecting in a more personal sense, Seeress releases their long-anticipated EP in conjunction with a spring tour, with no end in sight.
Venue Information:
The Grog Shop
2785 Euclid Heights Blvd
Cleveland, OH, 44106
http://grogshop.gs/